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SEALS News Law Teachers Workshop

This year, the Southeastern Association of Law Schools (SEALS) will be offering a New Law Teachers’ Workshop at our annual meeting.  It will include a variety of panels designed to prepare the new (or newer) law professor for his/her new career.  We hope that you will consider sending your new faculty to this workshop.

Several things to note about the SEALS workshop.  First, it is relatively inexpensive ($150 registration fee for faculty from member schools and $175 fee for faculty from non-member schools which is a fraction of the cost of other comparable programs).  Second, in addition to being able to attend the New Law Teachers’ Workshop, attendees will have access to the entire SEALS meeting, including a rich variety of programs on pedagogy, research, publishing opportunities, etc., (see below) as well as programs on an array of substantive topics.  Included in the general SEALS programming are specific programs designed specifically for legal writing and clinical faculty.  Finally, and again for the same $150 fee, faculty from institutional member and affiliate schools will have the opportunity to participate in the New Scholars Workshop.  This latter workshop allows young faculty to present a work in progress, to have a mentor, and to receive feedback on their scholarly projects.

Listed below is the rich tapestry of programs available to SEALS attendees.  For this particular workshop, we will include the following panels:

Teaching Students Born In the Digital Age
As students get younger, and we professors age, the phrase “mind the gap” becomes increasingly pertinent. The panelists have ideas on how to connect with the newest generation to attend law school, from differing uses of mobile learning, such as pod casts, to using the Internet and multimedia in the classroom, videos, flipping the classroom, new technologies, and much more.

Speakers: Professor Brannon Denning, Samford University’s Cumberland School of Law; Professor Michael Rich, Elon University School of Law; Professor Maggie Thomas, Louisiana State University Paul M. Hebert Law Center; Professor Laurie Zimet, University of California, Hastings, College of the Law

Becoming a Productive and Fulfilled Scholar. (Panel and Breakout Groups).
This panel of experienced scholars will discuss a variety of topics, including what a “scholarly agenda” is and how to develop one; alternate routes to tenure and self-fulfillment; using colleagues and research assistants in productive ways; the art or luck of publishing “well;” the importance of presenting at conferences; and how to enjoy, not dread, the scholarly process. The discussion will include the “nuts and bolts” of writing – where, when, what, and why. The panelists will then lead a breakout group to discuss these topics with participants in more depth in a roundtable format.

Moderator: Professor Colin Marks, St. Mary’s University School of Law

Speakers: Professor Linda D. Jellum, Mercer University Law School; Professor Ronald Krotoszynski, The University of Alabama School of Law; Professor Nancy Levit, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law

Discussion Group: Advice for Newer Law Professors from Law School Deans
Building on the success of last year, this Discussion Group will bring together a panel of experienced deans to give their perspective on issues common to newer professors. These include things like juggling multiple service requests, navigating faculty meetings, setting reasonable expectations of availability with students, and evaluating advice from all the many people who will want to provide it. The discussion group will have ample opportunity for individual questions and for breaking into smaller groups.

Moderator: Professor Jennifer Bard, Texas Tech University School of Law

Discussants: Dean William Adams, Deputy Managing Director, American Bar Association, Section on Legal Education; Dean Luke Bierman, Elon University School of Law; Dean Nora Demleitner, Washington and Lee University School of Law; Dean Daisy Floyd, Mercer University Law School; Dean Jon Garon, Nova Southeastern University, Shepard Broad Law Center; Dean Richard Gershon, The University of Mississippi School of Law; Dean Danielle Holley-Walker, Howard University School of Law; Dean Ian Holloway, Calgary Law School; Dean Alicia Ouellette, Albany Law School; Professor Elizabeth Pendo, Saint Louis University School of Law; Dean Christopher Pietruszkiewicz, Stetson University College of Law

Creating Successful Methods of Assessment, Including Essays and Multiple Choice Questions
The panelists for this session will explore formative and summative assessment tools, especially in light of the future implementation of A.B.A. Standard 302, Learning Outcomes. The tools include writing a meaningful exam and creating efficient formative assessments during the semester. Topics will include the basic mechanics of exam-writing, constructing useful formative tools, and related matters such as cultural implications, the relevance of disabilities, and the rationales behind open and closed book exams.

Moderator: Professor Joel Mintz, Nova Southeastern University, Shepard Broad Law Center

Speakers: Professor Doug Chapman, Elon University School of Law; Professor Michael Coenen, Louisiana State University Paul M. Hebert Law Center; Professor Eang Ngov, Barry University, Dwayne O. Andreas School of Law; Professor Nancy Soonpaa, Texas Tech University School of Law

Designing Effective First Year Courses and Upper Level Elective Courses
The panelists, who have spent many years designing effective courses and seminars,, will discuss syllabus design, how to make decisions about the allocation and amount of coverage, the selection of texts and supplemental reading material, the amount of reading to assign, setting outcomes for the course or seminar, and overall teaching philosophy. Each panelist will then lead a breakout group to discuss these issues in-depth with participants in a roundtable format.

Moderator: Professor Susan Klein, University of Texas School of Law

Speakers: Professor Kathy Cerminara, Nova Southeastern University, Shepard Broad Law Center; Professor Howard Katz, Elon University School of Law; Professor Ben Madison, Regent University School of Law

Putting Your Teaching Philosophy to Work In the Classroom
The panelists, all dedicated and excellent teachers, will discuss their teaching philosophies and the differing methods they use to implement those philosophies. The panelists also will discuss concrete issues, such as the role of different learning styles, the best methods of controlling the classroom, time management, coverage of material, and teaching respect, professionalism and cultural awareness in the classroom. Each panelist will then lead a breakout group to discuss these issues with participants in depth in a roundtable format. Some of the breakouts will focus on nuts and bolts; other groups will pursue broader issues such as teaching philosophy.

Speakers: Professor Enrique Armijo, Elon University School of Law; Professor Olympia Duhart, Nova Southeastern University, Shepard Broad Law Center; Professor Susan Kuo, University of South Carolina School of Law; Professor Connie Wagner, Saint Louis University School of Law

 

Among the many other panels and discussion groups that may be of interest to new faculty are the following (a draft program for the entire meeting can be found at sealslawschools.org):

WORKSHOP ON TEACHING
Strategies for Implementing Experiental Learning
This panel will involve authors who have created experiential learning materials. They will explain how their materials use experiential concepts and help students achieve a fuller experience in the classroom.

Speakers: Professor Prentiss Cox, University of Minnesota Law School; Professor Deborah Gerhardt, University of North Carolina School of Law; Professor Colleen Medill, University of Nebraska College of Law; Professor Paula Schaefer, The University of Tennessee College of Law

THE FUTURE OF LEGAL EDUCATION IN AN ABA WORLD: Creating Learning Objectives Under the New A.B.A. Standards
The panelists will explore the new ABA Standards, especially the new Standard 302 on learning outcomes, and how to implement these standards on a local level. The commentators will respond to the panelists, offering perspectives on how to articulate learning outcomes in different law school settings. The areas covered may include such topics as writing outcomes in syllabi, mapping the curriculum, communicating outcomes to students, and learning how to assess a variety of outcomes.

Moderator: Professor Steve Friedland, Elon University School of Law

Speakers: Professor William Adams, Deputy Managing Director; Professor Barry Currier, Managing Director, Accreditation and Legal Education ABA Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar

Commentators: Professor Andrea Funk, Whittier Law School; Professor Billie Jo Kaufman, American University, Washington College of Law; Professor Missy Lonegrass, Louisiana State University Paul M. Hebert Law Center; Professor Elizabeth Pendo, Saint Louis University School of Law; Professor Scott Rempell, South Texas College of Law

WORKSHOP ON DISTANCE LEARNING
Distance Learning – Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow
Law schools have been experimenting with distance learning strategies for almost twenty years. Models include synchronous, asynchronous and hybrid. Does it all work? What works best? Hear from the early adopters who co-taught students in classes hundreds of miles apart, a leader in today’s fully on-line law school, and experimenters with a hybrid online law degree for part-time students, which may be tomorrow’s normal.

Moderator: Professor Ellen Podgor, Stetson University College of Law

Speakers: Professor Greg Brandes, Concord Law School; Professor Simon Cannick, William Mitchell College of Law; Associate Dean Billie Jo Kaufman, American University, Washington College of Law; Professor Korin Munsterman, Florida Coastal School of Law; Professor Karen Westwood, William Mitchell College of Law

Academic and Trade Presses: The How-What-When of Book Publishing
This panel will address the process of academic and trade book publishing and the changes in book publishing brought about by the economy and the digital age. The panelists will address what publishers are looking for in books in terms of topics, market, and shelf life, how to architect a book proposal (including the ethics and etiquette of multiple submissions), and different presses’ emphases or niches. The panelists will include principally academic publishers, although several of the committed partcipants have experience with trade presses and crossover marketing.

Moderator: Professor Nancy Levit, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law

Speakers: Ms. Debbie Gershenowitz, Cambridge University Press; Mr. Thomas LeBien, Harvard University Press; Professor Niko Pfund, Oxford University Press; Mr. Keith Sipe, Carolina Academic Press

WORKSHOP ON DISTANCE LEARNING
Technology in the Classroom and at a Distance
Online Classroom technology has moved beyond Power Points to include smart device response systems, group twitter projects, portfolio projects, and group chat project systems. These are just a few of the technologies that are available to use in the traditional classroom or in a distance course. Remember, under ABA Standards, up to 1/3 of any class may be taught online.

Moderator: Professor Roberta Studwell, Barry University, Dwayne O. Andreas School of Law

Speakers: Professor Greg Clinton, North Carolina Central University School of Law; Professor James Cooper, Kaplan University; Professor Tom Furby, Southern Illinois University School of Law; Professor Lucille Ponte, Florida Coastal School of Law

Doctrinal-Clinical Collaborations: Making Learning More Relevant by Bringing Local Cases into the Classroom
Abstract: Professors face an interesting conundrum: an increased emphasis on preparing students for modern practice, when they may not have recent practice experience. What better way to keep current on legal trends, than to analyze real-life, local examples from the clinical program? Real case examples are excellent assessment tools, and a chance for students to engage in practical, real-life legal analysis and problem-solving. This session presents a mix of doctrinal and clinical professors who use real-life examples and simulations to enrich their teaching. They will share examples of clinic-doctrinal collaborations, including immigration, health, contracts, and consumer law.

Moderator: Professor Peter Hoffman, Elon University School of Law

Speakers: Professor Jason Cade, University of Georgia School of Law; Professor Erin Corcoran, University of New Hampshire School of Law; Professor Genevieve Hebert-Fajardo, St. Mary’s University School of Law; Professor Heather Scavone,

Casebook Publishing
This panel will address various issues related to casebook publishing, including how to frame a casebook proposal, modern trends in casebook drafting and production, and the future of the casebook. The speakers all work for prominent casebook publishing companies.

Speakers: Ms. Kimberly Brennen, LexisNexis; Ms. Pamela Siege Chandler, West Academic; Mr. Scott Sipe, Carolina Academic Press

WORKSHOP ON DISTANCE LEARNING
Educating the Digital Lawyer
Today’s digital lawyer must understand law practice automation and legal information science. Legal education must not only teach the substance of law but also the technology of today’s practice of law.The virtual practice of law is a reality, and ”digital across the curriculum” is becoming the new normal. Distance learning provides the tools and strategies to educate these digital lawyers.

Moderator: Professor Adeen Postar, University of Baltimore School of Law

Speakers: Professor Aryan Kushan, American University, Washington College of Law; Professor Susie Pontiff Stringer, Florida Coastal School of Law; Professor Lisa Smith Butler, Charleston School of Law; Professor Rebecca Trammell, Stetson University College of Law

TEACHING WORKSHOP
Discussion Group: Discussion Group: Techniques for Teaching Critical Reading in Law School Courses
Critical reading is a foundational skill for law school success. Research has found that reading techniques may be more predictive of law school success than LSAT scores. While some students enter law school with excellent critical reading abilities, others may struggle because their critical reading techniques are not effective. This panel will explore the following: What critical reading skills are needed in legal education? What instructional techniques can be utilized to enhance these skills? Direct instruction in doctrinal, writing, and skills courses?Metacognitive and self-assessment techniques? Mindfulness meditation to develop better habits of focus, listening, and concentration? Can critical reading skills impact writing? Will deficiencies in critical reading skills impact student performance?

Moderator: Professor David Orozco, Florida State University College of Law

Discussants: Professor Susan Ayres, Texas A&M University School of Law; Professor Brett A. Brosseit, Ave Maria School of Law; Professor Jane Bloom Grise, University of Kentucky College of Law; Professor Joan MacLeod Heminway, The University of Tennessee College of Law; Professor Angela Mae Kupenda, Mississippi College School of Law; Professor Laterina Luwinbuk, South Texas College of Law; Ms. Peg McCann, Mercer University Law School; Professor Kim Morse, Saint Louis University School of Law; Professor Lydie Pierre-Louis, University of San Francisco School of Law

WORKSHOP ON DISTANCE LEARNING
Going the Distance with Experiential Learning
Experiential learning and assessment of learning are required by ABA standards. Distance learning tools including video conferencing, clinic and class “chat rooms,” interactive portfolio projects, student web pages and much more can facilitate implementation of these standards. These are only a few of the tools can be used to support and enhance on campus class as well as off-site instruction and assessment.

Moderator: Professor Sally Wise, University of Miami School of Law

Speakers: Professor Heather Cucolo, New York Law School; Professor Glenn Greenberg, American University, Washington College of Law; Associate Dean Korin Munsterman, Florida Coastal School of Law; Professor Charles Rose, Stetson University College of Law

Writing to Learn & Learning to Write: Integrating Skills & Doctrine in Your Classroom
An increasing number of law teachers are erasing the artificial separation of skills and doctrine in legal education, transforming the classroom experience for their students and themselves. The speakers on this panel integrate skills and doctrine in their classrooms, using writing as a tool for learning doctrine while improving the practical skills that students will need in their careers. The teaching materials and techniques they use can help you design effective assignments and assessment tools, maximize your students’ learning, and build a bridge from law study to law practice. You will leave this session energized and inspired, with the tools you need to create a classroom where skills and doctrine work together for the benefit of your students.

Speakers: Professor J. Lyn Entrikin, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, William H. Bowen School of Law; Professor Deborah Gordon, Drexel University School of Law; Professor Katrina June Lee, The Ohio State University, Moritz College of Law; Professor Karen Speiser Sanner, Saint Louis University School of Law; Professor Mary Rose Strubbe, Chicago-Kent College of Law; Professor Catherine Wasson, Elon University School of Law

Discussion Group: The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act at 40
The Education for All Handicapped Children Act, now the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, has been the primary federal influence on the education of children with disabilities since its enactment. In its 40th anniversary year with a reauthorization long overdue, it is ripe for reassessment. This discussion group will examine this legislation, reflecting on what has worked, what hasn’t, and what can be improved in an anticipated reauthorization. It will also consider the disconnect between the United States’ domestic recognition of educational rights for children with disabilities and its minimal effort to ratify the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

Moderator: Professor Lisa Lukasik, Campbell University, Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law

Discussants: Professor Derek Black, University of South Carolina School of Law; Professor Michael Churgin, University of Texas School of Law; Professor Robert Dinerstein, American University, Washington College of Law; Professor Preston Green, University of Connecticut School of Education; Professor Richard Peterson, Pepperdine University School of Law; Professor Emily Suski, Georgia State University College of Law; Professor Joe Tulman, University of the District of Columbia, David A. Clarke School of Law; Professor Jennifer Valverde, Rutgers University, Newark School of Law; Professor Julie Waterstone, Northwestern University School of Law; Professor Mark Weber, DePaul College of Law

Accommodating Students with Disabilities
The year 2015 marks the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act and the 40th anniversary of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (the special education state). September 26, 2013, marked the 40th Anniversary of the enactment of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. Section 504 required that programs receiving federal financial assistance (which includes virtually all law schools) could not discriminate on the basis of disability. The enormous impact of this law (and later the Americans with Disabilities Act) on legal education and the legal profession was not foreseen in 1973. Disability discrimination law has generated an enormous body of judicial opinion and regulatory guidance. There are a range of issues affecting legal education. This session will focus on major issues that continue to be of concern and require careful balancing of interests. These include who is currently covered under the amended definition of disability, mental health (and substance abuse) issues, accommodations for learning disabilities and related disabilities (such as ADD, ADHC, and anxiety disorders), and technology issues (web access, distance learning, e-readers, etc.).

Moderator: Professor Grace Lee, The University of Alabama School of Law

Speakers: Professor Antonette Barilla, Elon University School of Law; Professor Rana Boujaoude, Golden Gate University School of Law; Professor Dyane O’Leary, Suffolk University Law School; Professor Laura Rothstein, University of Louisville, Louis D. Brandeis School of Law

Madness in the Academy: Law Professors with Severe Mental Illness
One of the rarely discussed secrets about legal education is that there are, in the ranks of law teachers, those who live every day with severe mental illness. In a nation where one in four Americans are touched by mental illness every year, many law faculty must be so afflicted. Despite that truth, only a very few—to date less than ten—publicly acknowledge their condition. While there may be many explanations for this situation, stigma sticks out. Stigma and discrimination have followed mental illness throughout history, and sadly is alive and well in 2015. It leaves people afraid to disclose fundamental aspects of their lives, and marginalizes a large population to an alarming degree. At its worst, stigma can kill, as demonstrated by the death by suicide in 2014 of Vermont Law School Professor Cheryl Hanna who ended her life after leaving a psychiatric hospital where she was being treated for depression because, at least in part, she feared stigma would harm her career if she stayed in the hospital while having her illness properly treated. The principal speakers at this panel live with, respectively, schizophrenia, major depression, an anxiety disorder, and bipolar disorder and will recount their stories there. The program will interest those concerned over mental illness in the academy whether in others or, quite likely for some, themselves. The speakers will also offer their thoughts over the way law schools treat students who face mental health issues, including those who must deal with the questions many bar character and fitness committees still ask about the psychiatric conditions of law license applicants.

Moderator: Professor Jennifer Bard, Texas Tech University School of Law

Speakers: Professor Brian S. Clarke, Charlotte Law School; Professor James T.R. Jones, University of Louisville, Louis D. Brandeis School of Law; Professor Lisa T. McElroy, Drexel University School of Law; Professor Elyn R Saks, University of Southern California Law School

 

Russell L. Weaver
Professor of Law & Distinguished University Scholar
University of Louisville Louis D. Brandeis School of Law

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