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Call for Papers Committee

Mission

The mission of the SEALS Call for Papers Committee is to solicit, identify, and honor outstanding scholarship being prepared by faculty at our member schools. Each fall, the committee solicits new papers that have not yet been published. Each committee member reads each of these papers, judging the contribution that each makes as well as the quality of the writing. At the annual meeting, the committee hosts a luncheon at which authors of the top papers are recognized and invited to make brief presentations.

Committee Members

  • Ron Rychlak (Mississippi) (Chair) rrychlak@olemiss.edu
  • Bill Araiza (Brooklyn)
  • Ellen Black (Belmont)
  • Steve Friedland (Elon)
  • Marco Jimenez (Stetson)
  • Gary Meyers (Missouri)
  • John Stinneford (Florida)

2021 Call for Papers Winners

“Finding Original Public Meanings”
James A. Macleod
Assistant Professor of Law
Brooklyn Law School

“Territorial Exceptionalism and the American Welfare State”
Andrew Hammond
Assistant Professor of Law
University of Florida Levin College of Law

“The Fraud Triangle and Tax Evasion”
Leandra Lederman
William W. Oliver Professor of Tax Law & Director of the Tax Program
Indiana University Maurer School of Law

List of Call for Papers Winners 

2020 Annual Report

This year the Call for Papers Committee was made up of Professors Bill Araiza (Brooklyn), Ellen Black (Belmont), Gary Meyers (Missouri), Steve Friedland (Elon), Marco Jimenez (Stetson), John Stinneford (Florida), and the chair. Russ Weaver put out the call for papers in late September, with a submission deadline of December 1. As always, it was noted that submissions may be on any topic related to law and may involve either an unpublished paper or an abstract, but the call also explained that in the past the judges have tended to favor completed papers over promising abstracts. We received approximately 20 submissions, which is consistent with recent years.  Almost most all of the submissions were completed papers of a very high quality. The entire committee read each paper and followed that with voting. We selected three papers: Susan Hazeldean, Privacy as Pretext; Zachary D. Kaufman, Protectors of Predators or Prey: Bystanders and Upstanders Amid Sexual Crimes; and Hannah Bloch-Wehba, Access to Algorithms. These papers will be presented remotely at the annual meeting.

2019 Annual Report

This year the Call for Papers Committee was made up of Professors Bill Araiza (Brooklyn), Gary Meyers (Missouri), Steve Friedland (Elon), Marco Jimenez (Stetson), John Stinneford (Florida), Ellen Black (Belmont) as well as the chair. Russ Weaver put out the call for papers in late September, with a submission deadline of December 1. As always, it was noted that submissions may be on any topic related to law and may involve either an unpublished paper or an abstract, but the call also explained that in the past the judges have tended to favor completed papers over promising abstracts. We received approximately 20 submissions, which is consistent with recent years.  Almost most all of the submissions were completed papers of a very high quality. The entire committee read each paper and followed that with voting. We selected two papers:  Jason R. Bent (Stetson University College of Law) – Is Algorithmic Affirmative Action Legal? and Gregory M. Stein (University of Tennessee College of Law) – Will the Sharing Economy Increase Inequality? These papers will be presented at the Call for Papers luncheon at the annual meeting.

2018 Annual Report

This year the Call for Papers Committee was made up of Professors Bill Araiza (Brooklyn), Gary Meyers (Missouri), Steve Friedland (Elon), Marco Jimenez (Stetson), John Stinneford (Florida) as well as the chair. Russ Weaver put out the call for papers in late September, with a submission deadline of December 1. As always, it was noted that submissions may be on any topic related to law and may involve either an unpublished paper or an abstract, but the call also explained that in the past the judges have tended to favor completed papers over promising abstracts. We originally received approximately 12 submissions, but we sent a later invitation, which brought in another eight or so submission. That left us with about 20, which is consistent with numbers received ever since we made it clear that completed papers were strongly favored over abstracts. Almost all of the submissions were completed papers of a very high quality. The entire committee read each paper and followed that with voting. We selected three papers: Andrew D. Bradt and D. Theodore Rave, “Aggregation on Defendants’ Terms”; Emily Berman, “A Government of Laws and Not of Machines”; and Carla Reyes, “If Rockefeller Were a Coder.” These papers will be presented at the Call for Papers luncheon at the annual meeting.

2017 Annual Report

This year the Call for Papers Committee was made up of Professors Bill Araiza (Brooklyn), Gary Meyers (Missouri), Steve Friedland (Elon), and Marco Jimenez (Stetson), as well as the chair. Russ Weaver put out the call for papers in late September, with a submission deadline of December 1. As always, it was noted that submissions may be on any topic related to law and may involve either an unpublished paper or an abstract, but the call also explained that in the past the judges have tended to favor completed papers over promising abstracts. We received approximately 20 submissions, which is low but consistent with numbers received in years since we have made it clear that completed papers were strongly favored over abstracts. Almost all of the submissions were completed papers of a very high quality. The entire committee read each paper, and we had two rounds of voting. The winning authors and papers are: Professor Stephanie Bornstein, University of Florida Fredric G. Levin College of Law, Reckless Discrimination; Professor David Han, Pepperdine University School of Law, Middle-Value Speech; and Professor John Newman, University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law, The Myth of the Free.

2016 Annual Report

This year the Call for Papers Committee was made up of Professors Bill Araiza (Brooklyn), Michael Green (Texas A&M), Steve Friedland (Elon), and Marco Jimenez (Stetson), as well as the chair. Russ Weaver put out the call for papers in late September, with a submission deadline of December 1. As always, it was noted that submissions may be on any topic related to law and may involve either an unpublished paper or an abstract, but the call also explained that in the past the judges have tended to favor completed papers over promising abstracts. We received approximately 22 submissions, which was a slight decrease from last year but about the same as two years ago. Almost all of the submissions were completed papers of a very high quality. The entire committee read each paper, and we had two rounds of voting. The winning authors and papers are: Professor David Fagundes, University of Houston Law Center, Property, Acquisition, and Happiness; Professor Meredith Harbach, University of Richmond School of Law, Nudging Parents; Professor Megan La Belle, The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law, Public Enforcement of Patent Law; Professor Matthew Tokson, NKU Chase College of Law,Knowledge and Fourth Amendment Privacy. They were all invited to present their papers at the annual meetings.

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